Available courses

This course will present core subject areas of analytical philosophy of science. No in-depth knowledge of any science is presupposed for this course, nor is mathematics beyond basic algebra. The bulk of the course is concerned with ‘general’ philosophy of science rather than with the philosophies of specific sciences (such as the philosophy of quantum mechanics or Darwinian evolution). There will, however, be two lectures on the philosophies of the special sciences, one on the philosophy of biology and one on the philosophy of chemistry, at the end of the course in order to convey the main idea of what a philosophy of a special science amounts to.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Roman FriggPicture of Ioannis Votsis

This course explores how numbers are deployed in social settings, and how they are used in sociology to construct and challenge our understanding of the social world. The first term introduces students to the importance of quantification in modern societies, considers the political and social uses of quantitative data, and provides an overview of the methods used to work with such data in contemporary sociology. In the second term students will develop basic descriptive skills of quantitative data analysis, notably how to download large data sets, how to manipulate variables and carry out descriptive statistical analyses with the statistical software Stata, and how to present statistical information in tabular and graphical form. 


    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Fabien AccominottiPicture of Ioanna GousetiPicture of Jouni KuhaPicture of Daniel McarthurPicture of Cynthia MeersohnPicture of Michael SavagePicture of Francine TonkissPicture of George Tzougas

The course provides an introduction to theoretical, historical and contemporary debates around race, racism and ethnicity. It firstly explores the main theoretical perspectives which have been used to analyse racial and ethnic relations, in a historical and contemporary framework. It then examines the historical, social and political context of racial relations in contemporary societies, focusing primarily on Britain, although it also draws on comparative examples. Race relations and social theory; race and ethnicity in historical perspective; race and class; race and the nation-state; multiculturalism; black feminism; diaspora and hybridity; whiteness; mixed race; racism and the legacy of Empire; race and immigration; race relations and public policy; race, racism and riots; community cohesion; Muslim identities; asylum and new migrations; racism in contemporary Europe.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Suki AliPicture of Paz ConchaPicture of Antonia DawesPicture of Louise FisherPicture of Nazia HusseinPicture of Helen Kim2Picture of Rozlyn Redd

The aim of the course is to introduce students to the preparation, uses and limitations of accounting information and to the principles on which financial decisions are based.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Justin Adams5Picture of Anastasia AndrikogiannopoulouPicture of Rebecca BakerPicture of Elisabetta BerteroPicture of Chris ConstantinouPicture of Libon FungPicture of Daphne HartPicture of Saipriya KamathPicture of Pik LiewPicture of Sandra MaPicture of Richard MacvePicture of Farooq MahmoodPicture of Dorothy RichardsPicture of Elizabeth VenningPicture of Yang WangPicture of Dmitrii Zhikharevich

This term’s part of the course will explore a key anthropological theme: the relationship between nature and culture. Following an introduction to what anthropologists do (and why they do it), we begin with an exploration of eating arrangements and food preferences, a mundane but profound example of how culture influences natural processes. We then draw on theories of rites of passage to explore birth, initiation and death. Why are life stages constructed and managed by cultural groups in such different ways, and can we make any general statements about such rituals? After reading week, we learn about diverse cultural perspectives on the ‘natural’ environment, before examining the difficult but ‘non-natural’ topic of race. We then explore two questions central to thinking about cultural difference: Why do humans (and not animals) have cultures? How far (if at all) does language shape human thought? Finally, we end the term with a provocative debate about whether human beings are naturally violent.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Catherine AllertonPicture of Katherine GardnerPicture of Insa KochPicture of Marco MaragnoPicture of Andrea PiaPicture of ALESSANDRA RADICATIPicture of Charles StaffordPicture of Di Wu3

The main aim of this course is to examine the relationship between theory and ethnography in modern social and cultural anthropology.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Fenella CannellPicture of Deborah JamesPicture of Adam KuperPicture of Mathijs Pelkmans

This is an introductory course in Economics for students who have not studied the subject at 'A' level or equivalent.

EC100 Course Guide

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Xijie GaoPicture of Alan ManningPicture of Rachel NgaiPicture of Roberto Claudio SormaniPicture of Alice Williams

EC102 Course Guide

This is an introductory course in microeconomics and macroeconomics for those expecting to take further courses in economics.

Note: Graduate Teaching Assistants (who are often PhD students) will teach classes on this course.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Olivia BirchallPicture of Francesco CaselliPicture of Erik EysterPicture of Hanwei Huang7Picture of Nikolitsa LampropoulouPicture of Francesco NavaPicture of Gianmarco OttavianoPicture of Giuseppe RossittiPicture of Judith ShapiroPicture of Alice Williams

EC201 Course Guide

An intermediate course in microeconomic analysis.

Course content

I. Consumer Theory. Utility functions and indifference curves. Income and substitution effects. The Slutsky equation. The expenditure function, compensating and equivalent variation, and consumer surplus. Selected applications to savings and labour supply, including the effects of taxes and benefits.

II. Producer Theory. Production and cost functions. Firm and industry supply. Perfect Competition and Monopoly.

III. Strategic Choice. Basic ideas in game theory. Applications to oligopoly.

IV. General equilibrium and welfare. Competitive equilibrium. Efficiency of equilibrium. Welfare criteria.

V. Topics in welfare economics. Public goods, externalities, second best pricing.

VI. Uncertainty and information. Choice under uncertainty. Insurance markets. Asymmetric information. Selected applications.


Note: Graduate Teaching Assistants (who are often PhD students) will teach classes on this course.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Margaret BrayPicture of Felix KoenigPicture of Mark SchankermanPicture of Judith ShapiroPicture of Chiara SotisPicture of Alice Williams

EC202 course material is hosted here.

EC202 Course Guide

Note: Graduate Teaching Assistants (who are often PhD students) will teach classes on this course.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Frank CowellPicture of Andrew EllisPicture of Alkiviadis Georgiadis-HarrisPicture of Judith ShapiroPicture of Alice Williams

EC210 Course Guide

An intermediate-level course in macroeconomics. 

Note: Graduate Teaching Assistants (who are often PhD students) will teach classes on this course.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Alek KlodaPicture of Maria Lopez-UribePicture of Rachel NgaiPicture of Ricardo ReisPicture of Judith ShapiroPicture of Kevin SheedyPicture of Alice Williams

EC220 Course Guide

EC221 Course Guide

Note: Graduate Teaching Assistants (who are often PhD students) will teach classes on this course.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Karun AdusumilliPicture of Nikolaos AndreoulisPicture of Miguel Bandeira Da SilvaPicture of Andrés Barrios FernándezPicture of Mohan BijapurPicture of Canh Thien DangPicture of Greg FischerPicture of William MatchamPicture of Taisuke OtsuPicture of Steve PischkePicture of Marcia SchafgansPicture of Alice Williams

EC315 Course Guide

International Macroeconomics: The course offers an introduction to international macroeconomic theory and develops the main tools for macroeconomic policy analysis. We start by studying the balance of payment and the determination of exchange rates, money, and prices in open economies. We discuss the costs and benefits of different nominal exchange rate regimes and their sustainability, examining the causes and consequences of speculative attacks and financial crises, the role of international financial markets, and international macroeconomic independence.

International Trade Theory: This part of the course strives to explain the pattern of trade observed in the world and to account for the prices at which goods are traded. Positive and normative aspects of international markets are examined. Use is made of the theory of comparative advantage, increasing returns, and strategic theories of international trade. Relations between trade and domestic markets for both goods and factors are examined in terms of the theory of trade according to factor endowments.

The course studies the effect of trade policy within both partial and general equilibrium frameworks. Economic integration between countries is also discussed using the same modelling tools.

Note: Graduate Teaching Assistants (who are often PhD students) will teach classes on this course.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Marcus BiermannPicture of Swati DhingraPicture of Keyu JinPicture of Dennis NovyPicture of Judith ShapiroPicture of Alice WilliamsPicture of Tianle Zhang

EC317 Course Guide

The course seeks to introduce students to the major theoretical principles of labour economics and to recent applied work in the area. Topics will include labour supply, welfare policies, labour demand, the impact of the minimum wage, labour market equilibrium, the impact of immigration, wage determination, the formation of human capital, motivation of workers and issues in personnel economics, compensating wage differentials, discrimination, wage inequality, and trade unions.

Note: Graduate Teaching Assistants (who are often PhD students) will teach classes on this course.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Esteban AucejoPicture of Giulia BoviniPicture of Pawel BukowskiPicture of Luca CitinoPicture of Monica LangellaPicture of Stephan MaurerPicture of Guy MichaelsPicture of Steve PischkePicture of Judith ShapiroPicture of Hugo VilaresPicture of Alice Williams

EC321 Course Guide

Note: Graduate Teaching Assistants (who are often PhD students) will teach classes on this course.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Charles BeanPicture of Judith ShapiroPicture of Kevin SheedyPicture of Alice Williams

EC325 Course Guide

Note: Graduate Teaching Assistants (who are often PhD students) will teach classes on this course.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Xavier JaravelPicture of Camille LandaisPicture of Daniel ReckPicture of Arthur SeiboldPicture of Judith ShapiroPicture of Xuezhu ShiPicture of Alice Williams

EC402 Course Guide

Please note: Teaching Fellows (who are often MRes and PhD students) may teach on this course.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Vassilis hajivassiliouPicture of Tatiana KomarovaPicture of Rachael MeagerPicture of Jennifer O'ConnellPicture of Mark SchankermanPicture of Alice Williams

EC413 Course Guide

Please note: Teaching Fellows (who are often MRes and PhD students) may teach on this course.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Wouter DenHaanPicture of Jennifer O'ConnellPicture of Alice WilliamsPicture of Alwyn Young

The course is designed to introduce students not only to a wide variety of topics and issues, but also to the wide variety of approaches used by historians. The course includes analyses of the original leading nation, Britain, and its replacement, the United States, as well as the catch-up of areas such as continental Europe, and the failure to catch-up of earlier well-placed areas such as Latin America. The effects of major events - such as wars and debt crises - are investigated, and we also consider the implications of changing global economic institutions, such as the Gold Standard and IMF, as well as the effects of sometimes rapid changes in product and process technology.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Christopher MinnsPicture of Eric Schneider

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the processes of domestic adjustment - in terms of institutional settings, political behaviour and policy processes - contingent on the participation of member states in the European Union. Thus, the course examines differing conceptualisations and empirical applications of 'Europeanisation' within comparative government, politics and public policy. Europeanisation has become an increasingly important focus in contemporary research, as parallel processes of convergence and divergence are apparent in the integration process and the relevance of distinct domestic settings is highlighted in this regard. With a focus on Europeanisation, the perspective is distinct from, but complementary to, existing courses on regional integration and allows students greater scope to examine patterns of domestic response to shared stimuli. At the same time, the course explores the conceptual and methodological issues that are relevant to 'Europeanisation', so as to facilitate an overall evaluation of scholarship to date.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of MICHAEL COTTAKISPicture of Madalina DobrescuPicture of Roch Dunin-WąsowiczPicture of Kevin FeatherstonePicture of Stephanie FinneyPicture of Lise HermanPicture of Stephen JennerPicture of Miriam SoracePicture of Bugra SuslerPicture of FEDERICO TRASTULLI

The purpose of this course is to analyse the process of European monetary integration and its implications for the institutions of economic governance in the EU. There will be a strong emphasis on using the experience of the financial and economic crises since 2008 as a source of evidence to assess both the performance of EMU and the theories about monetary integration. We consider the political and economic rationale for the establishment of EMU. We study the theory of optimal currency areas and its relevance today.

    Editor: Picture of Sabina Allam-PatelPicture of Clara CookPicture of Paul De-GrauwePicture of Roch Dunin-WąsowiczPicture of Sophie ElgoodPicture of Stephen JennerPicture of Vassilis MonastiriotisWaltraud SchelklePicture of Pieter Tuytens

This is the core course of the MSc Political Economy of Europe.

The purpose of this course is to provide a comprehensive coverage of the evolution of the political economies of Europe, both in Western and Central Europe, as well as the political economy of European economic integration.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Sabina Allam-PatelPicture of Johann BasedowPicture of Abel BojarPicture of Sarah-Esther CiagliaPicture of Clara CookPicture of MICHAEL COTTAKISPicture of Madalina DobrescuPicture of Roch Dunin-WąsowiczPicture of Sophie ElgoodPicture of Claire GordonPicture of Stephen JennerPicture of Vassilis MonastiriotisWaltraud Schelkle

Over the last three hundred years European societies have undergone a fundamental changeover from a traditional form, with a largely self-sufficient agrarian economy, into a modern, industrial and technological form based on international trade and tele-communication. This revolution developed in the seventeenth century first and only in Europe, but today it has spread worldwide and increasingly dominates the entire planet. This course explores one of the basic dimensions of this unprecedented globalization: the culture of Europe's politics.

Registration "statements" for this course are a merely formal requirement. Please feel free simply to state: "I have read the Course Outline and would like to take this course." There are no disciplinary prerequisites.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Sabina Allam-PatelPicture of Clara CookPicture of Sophie ElgoodPicture of Simon GlendinningPicture of Lise HermanPicture of Stephen JennerPicture of Giulia PastorellaPicture of Pieter TuytensPicture of Paula Zoido Oses

Aims to equip students with the fundamental concepts and tools underlying modern finance, both in the asset markets and the corporate finance side. Provides a foundation for subsequent courses offered by the Department.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Kate Borkowski1Picture of Helen BroadPicture of Jennifer CarrPicture of Hoyong Choi7Picture of James ClarkPicture of Brenda Clarkson-WilliamsPicture of Mary CombenPicture of Vicente CunatPicture of Bernardo De Oliveira Guerra RiccaPicture of Jason DonaldsonPicture of Daniel FerreiraPicture of Sylvain FriederichPicture of TENGYU GUOPicture of Jasper HeeksPicture of Petar SabtchevskyPicture of Ji Shen4Picture of Brenda SherwinPicture of Thomas WatsonPicture of Cheng Zhang14
    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Helen BroadPicture of Jennifer CarrPicture of Brenda Clarkson-WilliamsPicture of Mary CombenPicture of Kyle MoorePicture of Brenda SherwinPicture of Apostolos ThomadakisPicture of Thomas WatsonPicture of Yue YuanPicture of Konstantinos Zachariadis

Modern Portfolio Theory, Asset Pricing Models, Risk Models and Portfolio Risk Management, Bayesian Portfolio Choice, Black-Litterman, Trading Strategies, Global Asset Allocation, Currency Risk Management, Active Asset Management, Performance Evaluation.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Kate Borkowski1Picture of Helen BroadPicture of Jennifer CarrPicture of Brenda Clarkson-WilliamsPicture of Chardee EzadkhastyPicture of Stephane GuibaudPicture of Yueyang Han7Picture of Domingos RomualdoPicture of Brenda SherwinPicture of Thomas Watson

This course examines public policy formation, political processes and political institutions using formal modelling and data analysis. A one term course cannot offer a comprehensive treatment of the complex working of political systems. The emphasis is on introducing some key formal models to simplify and analyse broad classes of situations. Students are not only expected to be familiar with these models but also to be able to use them to solve problems of a technical nature. At the same time, rigorous empirical testing of formal models will be a central component of our approach to political economy. We will focus on the literature on collective action, voting, elections, interest groups, legislative organization, political agency and bureaucracies.


    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Salina BrownPicture of Mark BrycelandPicture of Torun DewanPicture of Roch Dunin-WąsowiczPicture of Andrew EggersPicture of Marco GianiPicture of Alexndra Gregory HobbsPicture of Charlotte GriffinPicture of Valentino LarcinesePicture of Konstantinos MatakosPicture of Brett MeyerPicture of Stephane Wolton
    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Robert BaldwinPicture of Salina BrownPicture of Mark BrycelandPicture of Katrin FlikschuhPicture of Alexndra Gregory HobbsPicture of Charlotte GriffinPicture of Jonathan HopkinPicture of Serena JamesPicture of Leigh JencoPicture of William KissanePicture of Brian KlaasPicture of Mathias Koenig-ArchibugiPicture of Denisa KostovicovaPicture of Frederick LakerPicture of Valentino LarcinesePicture of Martin LodgePicture of Edward PagePicture of Anne PhillipsPicture of Elisa RandazzoPicture of Cheryl Schonhardt-BaileyPicture of Livia SchubigerPicture of Susan Sharkey1Picture of Mark ThatcherPicture of Eiko ThielemannPicture of Laura Valentini

A comparative approach to the development of health care systems in advanced countries emphasizing present and future policy options and problems.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Rocco FriebelPicture of Gareth HopkinPicture of Anthony KingPicture of Sara MachadoPicture of Amy MatraiPicture of Elias MossialosPicture of Irene  Papanicolas

This course aims to present a framework to discuss the opportunities and challenges with performance measurement in health care, examine the various dimensions and levels of health system performance, identify the measurement instruments and analytic tools needed, and examine the implications of these issues for policy makers and regulators. Lectures generally focus on measuring health system performance in high-income countries but draw on the experience of other countries where relevant.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Muheez BusariPicture of Aifsha Butt5Picture of Konstantina DavakiPicture of Arjan GjoncaPicture of Georgios KavetsosPicture of Lisa McelhinneyPicture of Irene  PapanicolasPicture of Diana Quirmbach

.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Muheez BusariPicture of Aifsha Butt5Picture of John CairnsPicture of Rocco FriebelPicture of Sara MachadoPicture of Lisa McelhinneyPicture of Alistair McguirePicture of Melcior Rossello RoigPicture of Matthew Skellern

HY116 covers the history of international relations since the 1890s. The course emphasizes the changing character of international politics over the course of the period', and aims both to equip students with a knowledge of international politics since 1890 and to provide the factual grounding and conceptual apparatus necessary to understand the contemporary world. Lectures and classes focus particularly on the origins, course, and aftermath of three great conflicts: the First World War, the Second World War, and the Cold War.







This course focuses primarily on financially distressed registered companies and is concerned with the principles and policies underlying the legal treatment of corporate rescue.   Informal and formal legal procedures available for rescuing companies in distress are analysed as are comparative approaches - particularly Chapter 11 in the US.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Vanessa FinchPicture of Lee JacksonPicture of Sarah PatersonPicture of Amanda Tinnams

This course focuses primarily on insolvent registered companies and is concerned with the principles and policies underlying liquidation. The course examines the law and procedures affecting insolvent companies and those concerned with them (eg creditors, directors and employees) and considers the justifications underlying a corporate insolvency regime.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Vanessa FinchPicture of Lee JacksonPicture of Sarah PatersonPicture of Amanda Tinnams
This is a course about the taxation of transactions involving more than one country. The focus is on rules that operate at an international or supra-national level, and includes some material on the tax law of the European Union and other regional groupings.
  • Background: either a very basic knowledge of the tax system of any one country, or at least one other LLM tax course.
  • The initial Enrolment code is Taxation
    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Eduardo BaistrocchiPicture of Anna BilkisPicture of Aleksandra BojovicPicture of Ian Roxan

This course examines the regulatory structures governing financial markets and investment services. It covers the main principles of international, EU and UK financial regulation, focusing in more depth on the UK regime, with the aim of developing a critical understanding of the conceptual framework for financial regulation.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Julia BlackPicture of Giuliano CastellanoPicture of Christos HadjiemmanuilDr Philipp PaechPicture of Aikaterini PapapanagiotouPicture of Katerina PapapanagiotouPicture of Paolo SaguatoPicture of Anna Whaley

This is the core course of the specialism in Taxation. You must take this course in order to obtain the subject specialism in Taxation. The course will begin by studying the analysis of tax policy. It will also address a range of advanced topical issues in taxation.

  • Background: a good background in taxation.
  • The initial Enrolment code, if any, is "Taxation".
    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Eduardo BaistrocchiPicture of Anna BilkisPicture of Aleksandra BojovicPicture of AGNIESZKA MADYCKAPicture of Ian RoxanPicture of Karen Williams

This is a course on the taxation of businesses and business transactions in the United Kingdom, the US and Germany. A specialist topic such as the taxation of groups of companies will be looked at during the year.

  • Background: either previous study of tax law, or LL4Z1 Business Taxation.
  • The initial Enrolment code, if any, is "Taxation".
    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Eduardo BaistrocchiPicture of Aleksandra BojovicPicture of AGNIESZKA MADYCKAPicture of Ian Roxan
Seminar: LT Thursday 12:00-14:00 PAR.LG.03
    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Michael Blackwell

In this module, we will explore the regulation of mergers, acquisitions and restructurings in Europe. We will focus on legal techniques for the combination and restructuring of business operations in Europe, with a particular focus on the legal issues arising in cross-border transactions in the EU.

It is important to emphasise that this module is not a “deals course”. Although we will look at examples from real-life transactions, the course is not designed to teach you how to draft transactional documents; likewise, we will not discuss strategies for negotiating deals etc. Instead, the course is intended to familiarise you with the legal tools available to EU companies intending to reshape their operations by acquiring other firms, by changing their corporate or group structure, and by “moving” (re-incorporating and relocating their management or activities) across different jurisdictions.

There are a number of reasons for corporations wanting to restructure their operations or to make acquisitions. For instance, firms may want to acquire a strategically valuable firm or asset in order to improve the efficiency (and thus increase the value) of their business operations; they may want to implement a better governance structure, enabling them to manage their undertaking more effectively; or they may want to subject themselves to more favourable legal or tax rules – including choosing among different national corporate laws.

EU law offers a range of legal vehicles for achieving such aims, and it is these vehicles we will explore throughout the term. In particular, we will look at re-incorporations of EU companies based on the relevant Treaty provisions; takeovers of (listed) EU companies; domestic (“statutory”) mergers; de-mergers and spin-offs; cross-border mergers in the EU; and the European Company.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of David KershawPicture of Edmund-Philipp Schuster
    Teacher-Editor: Picture of David Kershaw

This course concerns the commercial, property and insolvency law aspects of international financial transactions. In short, it provides an academic analysis of how legal devices are used by financial institutions to make money from entering and subsequently dispersing financial risk on an international scale, and of the relevant limits that law imposes on this freedom. The course is therefore different from, but complimentary to, the course on International Financial Regulation, which rather concerns the limits to that activity set by the states for the common good.


    Teacher-Editor: Dr Philipp PaechPicture of Aikaterini PapapanagiotouPicture of Katerina PapapanagiotouPicture of Anna Whaley
    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Tatiana FlessasPicture of Tim MurphyPicture of Sonya OnwuPicture of Robert PottagePicture of Laura-Ann RoyalPicture of AYCAN YASAR

.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Tola AmoduPicture of Conor GeartyPicture of Martin LoughlinPicture of Mara MalagodiPicture of Jo MurkensPicture of Sonya OnwuPicture of Thomas PoolePicture of Laura-Ann RoyalPicture of Andrew ScottPicture of Gregoire WebberPicture of AYCAN YASAR

Medical Law LL205

Medical law is a lively and fast-moving subject. We are all recipients of medical care and medico-legal issues are increasingly the focus of media headlines.On this course you should achieve a good knowledge of the legal and regulatory frameworks governing medical decision-making. We will cover many controversial topics throughout the course. By the end of the course you should not only be able to describe the legal and regulatory issues involved, but also be able to discuss and analyse these in an informed and critical fashion.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Emily JacksonPicture of Julie McCandlessPicture of Sonya OnwuPicture of Laura-Ann RoyalPicture of AYCAN YASAR

The course is concerned with the regulation of personal relationships and the public and private consequences for individuals of this regulation. The course examines the legal constitution of families, the problems people encounter in their personal relationships and the legal responses to those problems. We are as concerned with what actually happens in practice and the policy behind it as with the law as stated in the books.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Fatima AhdashPicture of   BegumPicture of Rob GeorgePicture of Lee JacksonPicture of Julie McCandlessPicture of Sonya OnwuPicture of Helen ReecePicture of Laura-Ann RoyalPicture of AYCAN YASAR
    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Eduardo BaistrocchiPicture of Robert CraigPicture of Marcus De MatosPicture of Neil DuxburyPicture of Alexander GreenPicture of Paul MacMahonPicture of Emmanuel MelissarisPicture of Hillary NyePicture of Sonya OnwuFedericoPicture of Laura-Ann RoyalPicture of Leah TruebloodPicture of Emmanuel VoyiakisPicture of Michael WilkinsonPicture of AYCAN YASAR

LLM Essay Submission Portal

LLM Take Home Exam Submission Portal

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Rebecca Newman1Picture of Karen Williams

Write a concise and interesting paragraph here that explains what this course is about

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Gemma LongmirePicture of Olga SobolevPicture of Angus Wrenn

Moodle page for MA103 Introduction to Abstract Mathematics

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Martin AnthonyPicture of Graham BrightwellPicture of Elisabeth GriegerPicture of Konrad SwanepoelPicture of Bernhard von Stengel

This course develops the basic mathematical tools necessary for further study in economics and related disciplines. To this end we focus on: techniques of calculus (differentiation, partial differentiation, optimisation and integration), methods of linear algebra (use of matrices), and the solution of difference and differential equations. The ideas are taught systematically, with emphasis on their application to economic problems. Examples are used throughout the course for motivation and illustration.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of James Ward
    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Konrad Swanepoel

This is an undergraduate course on the theory of differential equations.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Jacqueline EveridPicture of Eleni KatirtzoglouPicture of Amol Sasane

Introduction to data structures and the theory of algorithms. Programming in Java.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Tugkan BatuPicture of Julia BoettcherPicture of Konrad Swanepoel

The course uses economic theory to gain insight into issues related to internal organisation and management of firms. The course will draw on various disciplines including management science, industrial organisation and microeconomics.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Adefoyekemi AdedayoPicture of Maria BustamantePicture of Rachel HarrisPicture of Jin LiPicture of Terri NatalePicture of Natalie ReillyPicture of Clare RoperPicture of Catherine Thomas

In this course we continue, deepen and extend the analysis of strategy. The success of a firm depends on the decisions it makes, and these decisions have to take the behaviour of competitors into account who themselves try to make optimal decisions. Thus the firm faces a problem of strategic interaction, and game theory takes this interaction consistently into account. This course aims at a strategic understanding of these situations and the decisions firms face. We will study general principles of strategic thinking, the application of these principles to specific problems and general conclusions we can draw in these situations.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Adefoyekemi AdedayoPicture of Rachel HarrisPicture of Natalie ReillyPicture of Clare RoperPicture of Jorn Rothe

This course is designed to provide students insights from economic theory that are relevant to applications in managerial decision making. The emphasis is on problem solving and applying microeconomic concepts. Topics covered include: Consumer behaviour, producer theory, economics of the firm, market structure, monopoly, oligopoly, product differentiation, pricing, game theory, decision analysis, bargaining, auctions.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Stephanie BonceyPicture of Zhuoqiong ChenPicture of Saul EstrinPicture of Aysegul KayaogluPicture of Vasileios KotsidisPicture of Kristof MadaraszPicture of Tian MengPicture of Catherine Thomas

The course provides a detailed consideration of the key elements of the concept of informational privacy, the open data movement and freedom of information. These topics lie at the intersection of diverse contemporary themes issues including, public sector reform, human rights, digital ecosystems and social networking, and the global and national regulation of business. The course content is international in focus, and reviews contemporary issues arising from new technologies, new policies of governments, new practices and business models in the private sector. Topics include personal privacy and identity systems; motivations for information sharing and transparency and its potential for driving beneficial change; transformations in the management of government information and processing practices; the technological and regulatory challenges faced by public sector and business; the protection of sensitive personal data including medical and financial information; data-mining in the context of national security and anti-terrorism policies; communications surveillance policies; behavioural studies of privacy attitudes and the evolution of trust and consent in online environments. The course enables students to develop their understanding of the challenges presented by new informational regimes, their regulatory development and emerging governance structures.  

    Teacher-Editor: Tony CornfordPicture of Eric SigmundssonPicture of Branimira SlavovaPicture of Edgar Whitley

 

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Eimear BreathnachPicture of Hayley GermanPicture of Freya GrisoniPicture of Rachel HarrisPicture of Maximilian HeitmayerPicture of Robert KirklandPicture of Gordon LiPicture of Connson LockePicture of Juan Lopez-CotareloPicture of Lucy Underhill

This course introduces students to theoretical and practical foundations of empirical social science research design. It provides an overview of qualitative, quantitative, and design science approaches to research. Drawing on a variety of examples in Information Systems and related social science disciplines, the course will provide a platform for students to consider a range of design options, as well as methodological techniques, to adopt in their own dissertations. By the end of the course, students will be familiar with a variety of research design options and will be better equipped not only to design, but also to collect and analyse data for, their own dissertations.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Chrisanthi AvgerouPicture of Nimesh DhunganaPicture of Esther HeyhoePicture of Benjamin LauderdalePicture of Stephen SmithsonPicture of Chana Teeger

The course is designed to equip students with the tools, imagination and independence for conducting qualitative research for the first time.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Nihan AlbayrakPicture of Audrey AlejandroPicture of Eleni AndreouliPicture of Aude BicqueletPicture of Rochelle BurgessPicture of Flora CornishPicture of Maria Cecilia Dedios Picture of Alex GillespiePicture of Elena Gonzalez-PolledoPicture of Ioanna GousetiPicture of Caroline HowarthPicture of Alasdair JonesPicture of Eleanor KnottPicture of Daniela LaiPicture of Cristian Montenegro CortesPicture of Neela MuhlemannPicture of Jen TarrPicture of Pak Chun YamPicture of Mi Zhao12

This course provides an introduction to statistical methods used for causal inference in the social sciences. Using the potential outcomes framework of causality, topics covered include research designs such as randomized experiments and observational studies. We explore the impact of noncompliance in randomized experiments, as well as nonignorable treatment assignment in observational studies. To analyze these research designs, the methods covered include matching, instrumental variables, difference-in-difference, synthetic control, and regression discontinuity. Examples are drawn from different social sciences.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Pablo BarberaPicture of Dominik HangartnerPicture of David HendryA bit too serious

This course focuses on data about connections, forming structures known as networks. Networks and network data describe an increasingly vast part of the modern world, through connections on social media, communications, financial transactions, and other ties. This course covers the fundamentals of network structures, network data structures, and the analysis and presentation of network data. Students will work directly with network data and structure and analyze these data using R.

For more information see the course guide.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Eleanor PowerMilena Tsvetkova
    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Christopher BluntPicture of   GriffithsPicture of Owen GriffithsPicture of James NguyenPicture of John Worrall

Topics to be covered will include some or all of the following: the explanation and interpretation of action, naturalist and hermeneutic social theory; the nature of 'social facts'; reductionism and methodological individualism; functional and structural explanations; rationality and relativism; the role of values in social science; social norms; the construction of social reality; methods of evolutionary explanation in the social sciences; philosophical and methodological critiques of evolutionary psychology. In additional, philosophical problems of particular social sciences such as anthropology, sociology, and economics will also be addressed.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Jason AlexanderPicture of Mattia GallottiPicture of Fiora SalisPicture of Stefan SchubertPicture of Nicolas Wuethrich

This course examines, from a philosophical perspective, the ways in which recent developments in genetics and neuroscience challenge our conceptions of what we are — and what we could become.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Jonathan BirchPicture of David Kinney
    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Richard BradleyPicture of Peter DennisPicture of Andrea LedwigPicture of ALEXANDER RAUBOPicture of Ewan Rodgers

PS 446 seeks to provide an insightful perspective on emerging aspects of organisational life by (a) grounding our understanding of these processes from a theoretical perspective and (b) meaningfully connecting with the domain of practice.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Amna AmerPicture of Jacqueline CranePicture of Neela MuhlemannPicture of Mark NoortPicture of Barry RogersPicture of Viviane Schwager

Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science archive of past student dissertations which achieved a mark of merit or distinction.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Frederic BassoPicture of Martin W BauerPicture of Stephen BennettPicture of Catherine CampbellPicture of Jacqueline CranePicture of Bradley FranksPicture of Lucia GarciaPicture of Alex GillespiePicture of Alexander GillespiePicture of Ilka GleibsPicture of Caroline HowarthPicture of Sandra JovchelovitchPicture of Barbara KarwalaPicture of Saadi LahlouPicture of Emily LeRoux-RutledgePicture of Jenevieve MannellPicture of Neela MuhlemannPicture of Michael MuthukrishnaTom ReaderPicture of Barry RogersPicture of Viviane SchwagerPicture of Jennifer Sheehy-SkeffingtonPicture of Ben ShenoyPicture of Caryn SolomonPicture of Jan StockdalePicture of Ly VooPicture of Benjamin VoyerPicture of Pak Chun YamPicture of Ai Yu

Welcome to SA4C9 Social Policy: Organisation and Innovation Lent term half unit course.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Elizabeth BaileyPicture of Nazmin BegumPicture of Thomas BiegertPicture of Clare GormanPicture of Ian McmanusPicture of Eileen MunroPicture of Anne OkelloPicture of Lucinda PlattPicture of Amanda SheelyPicture of Charlie Tickle

The 5,000-word compulsory dissertation is an integral component of the eMSc Health Economics, Policy and Management programme. It is an important opportunity to study a research question or policy problem in depth by reviewing the literature and providing a coherent analysis. It further gives an understanding of working on a project with specific objectives and deadlines and also a taste of academic research.

Students normally write up their dissertation during the summer after the final June teaching session, but please note that you are expected to start thinking about and researching your dissertation topic well in advance of this. The final output will be a piece of work that is written in an academic article format that is suitable for submission to a peer-reviewed journal.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Abigail HusselbyPicture of Sasha JespersonPicture of Anthony KingPicture of Amy MatraiPicture of Irene  PapanicolasPicture of Caroline Rudisill

This interdisciplinary course addresses contemporary global migration issues with reference to both developing and developed country contexts; international migration patterns and forms of migration; migration and inequalities; migration and the transformation of welfare systems; and the implications of migration for social and public policies. Teaching across the course integrates critical theoretical approaches to migration with applications using different migration-related research methods.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Clare GormanPicture of Lucinda PlattPicture of Isabel ShutesPicture of Charlie Tickle

 

 

 

.

 

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Nazmin BegumPicture of Angela Fitzgerald

The course analyses income maintenance and social security policies defined broadly to include not only national insurance and social assistance provisions but also fiscal, occupational and private provisions that maintain incomes. Definitions and measurements of need and poverty are reviewed. Economic and administrative aspects of social security and tax credits are considered, as is their impact on social and economic behaviour. A comparative approach is adopted.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Nazmin BegumPicture of Clare GormanPicture of Anne OkelloPicture of Kitty Stewart

This course is compulsory on the MSc in Social Policy (European and Comparative Social Policy). This course is not available as an outside option.


    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Clare Gorman

Course content

The purpose is to allow students to study a topic in depth researching the literature and analysing a subject: often these SA471 dissertations involve original perspectives or research and some have been subsequently published.


    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Clare GormanPicture of Charlie Tickle

The course provides an introduction to theoretical, historical and contemporary debates around race, racism and ethnicity. It firstly explores the main theoretical perspectives which have been used to analyse racial and ethnic relations, in a historical and contemporary framework. It then examines the historical, social and political context of racial relations in contemporary societies, focusing primarily on Britain, although it also draws on comparative examples. Race relations and social theory; race and ethnicity in historical perspective; race and class; race and the nation-state; multiculturalism; black feminism; diaspora and hybridity; whiteness; mixed race; racism and the legacy of Empire; race and immigration; race relations and public policy; race, racism and riots; community cohesion; Muslim identities; asylum and new migrations; racism in contemporary Europe.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Suki AliPicture of Matthew BrownPicture of Paz ConchaPicture of Antonia DawesPicture of Louise FisherPicture of Nazia HusseinPicture of Helen Kim2Picture of Rozlyn Redd
The course provides a precise and accurate treatment of introductory probability theory, statistical ideas, methods and techniques. Students will also be exposed to the Minitab statistical package. Topics covered are data visualisation and descriptive statistics, probability theory, random variables, common distributions of random variables, multivariate random variables, sampling distributions of statistics, point estimation, interval estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance (ANOVA), linear regression, nonparametric tests, goodness-of-fit and independence tests.
    Teacher-Editor: James AbdeyPicture of Penelope Smith
The elementary statistical tools necessary for further study in management and economics with an emphasis on the applicability of the methods to management and economic problems. Topics covered are data visualisation and descriptive statistics, probability theory, discrete probability distributions, continuous probability distributions, sampling distributions of statistics, point estimation, interval estimation, hypothesis testing, contingency tables and the chi-squared test, correlation and linear regression.
    Teacher-Editor: James Abdey

The course covers the probability, distribution theory and statistical inference needed for third-year courses in statistics and econometrics.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Matteo BarigozziPicture of Erik BaurdouxPicture of Kostas KalogeropoulosPicture of Milt MavrakakisPicture of Ragvir Sabharwal2

The application of compound interest techniques to financial transactions.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Angelos DassiosPicture of Gelly MitrodimaPicture of Yan Qu3Picture of Penelope SmithPicture of Hao XingPicture of Xiaolin Zhu15

An introduction to the theory and application of modern multivariate methods used in the Social Sciences.

Multivariate distributions, principal components analysis, exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, structural equation models, latent variable models for categorical variables, latent class models. 

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Myrsini KatsikatsouPicture of Irini Moustaki

This is a course on the theory of Stochastic Processes, with a view towards financial and actuarial applications. We shall be discussing continuous-time stochastic models used in the field of quantitative finance, as well as the stochastic calculus that comes with them.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Luciano CampiPicture of Umut CetinPicture of Konstantinos KardarasPicture of Jia Lim1Picture of Sarah Mcmanus

This course deals with the analysis of data from hierarchically structured populations (eg individuals nested within households or geographical areas) and longitudinal data (eg repeated measurements of individuals in a panel survey). Multilevel (random-effects) extensions of standard statistical techniques, including multiple linear regression and logistic regression, will be considered. The course will have an applied emphasis with computer sessions using appropriate software (eg Stata).

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Sarah McmanusPicture of Irini Moustaki

A broad introduction to statistical time series analysis for postgraduates: what time series analysis can be useful for; autocorrelation; stationarity; basic time series models: AR, MA, ARMA; invertibility; spectral analysis; estimation; forecasting. We will also discuss some of the following topics: financial time series and the GARCH model; and if time permits, multivariate time series and change point detection.

See also:
http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/calendar/courseGuides/ST/2017_ST422.htm

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Yining ChenPicture of Clifford LamPicture of Sarah Mcmanus

The course will provide a comprehensive coverage on some fundamental
aspects of probability and statistics methods and principles. It also
covers linear regression analysis. Data illustration using statistical
package R constitutes an integral part throughout the course, therefore
provides the hands-on experience in simulation and data analysis.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Beatrice AcciaiowicherPicture of Sarah McmanusPicture of Cheng Qian2Picture of Qiwei Yao

The purpose of this course is to (a) develop the students' computational skills, (b) introduce a range of numerical techniques of importance in actuarial and financial engineering, and (c) develop the ability of the students to apply the theory from the taught courses to practical problems, work out solutions including numerical work, and to present the results in a written report.

Binomial trees. Random number generation, the fundamentals of Monte Carlo simulation and a number of related issues. Finite difference schemes for the solution of partial differential equations arising in insurance and finance. Numerical solutions to stochastic differential equations and their implementation. 

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Umut CetinPicture of Kostas KalogeropoulosPicture of Sarah McmanusPicture of Gelly MitrodimaPicture of George Tzougas

Recent developments in the theory of stochastic processes and applications in finance and insurance and their interface. A variety of topics will be chosen from modelling with Lévy processes; securitisation; energy and commodity markets; actuarial and financial aspects of climate change.

    Teacher-Editor: Picture of Beatrice AcciaioPicture of Pauline BarrieuPicture of Erik BaurdouxPicture of Sarah Mcmanus