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This course gives students a critical understanding of ethnographic and theoretical writing on sub-Saharan Africa. Grounded in some classic debates around tradition and modernity (kinship-based polities vs states; studies on occult knowledge vs rationally-oriented political economy approaches; relationality and communality vs developmentally oriented progress; ‘objective’ class vs forms of identification such as tribe or race), it explores questions about how the sub-continent’s societies orient themselves, and respond to new precarities, in a postcolonial and neoliberal age.

    Teacher: Picture of Karin BarberPicture of Deborah James

This course gives students a critical understanding of ethnographic and theoretical writing on sub-Saharan Africa. Grounded in some classic debates around tradition and modernity (kinship-based polities vs states; studies on occult knowledge vs rationally-oriented political economy approaches; relationality and communality vs developmentally oriented progress; ‘objective’ class vs forms of identification such as tribe or race), it explores questions about how the sub-continent’s societies orient themselves, and respond to new precarities, in a postcolonial and neoliberal age.

    Teacher: Picture of Karin BarberPicture of Deborah JamesPicture of Megan Laws

This course provides a general introduction to Social Anthropology as the comparative study of human societies and cultures. Students will be introduced to key themes and debates in the history of the discipline. Ethnographic case studies will be drawn from work on a variety of societies, including hunter-gatherers, farmers, industrial labourers, and urban city-dwellers.

    Teacher: Picture of Catherine AllertonPicture of Lewis BeardmorePicture of Michael EdwardsPicture of Nicholas EvansPicture of Katharine FletcherPicture of Katherine GardnerPicture of Anishka Gheewala LohiyaPicture of Jason HickelPicture of Geoffrey HughesPicture of Insa KochPicture of Ken Kuroda1Picture of Jonah LiptonPicture of Branwen SpectorPicture of Charles Stafford

The course is intended to give an introduction to anthropological theory through the study of selected ethnographic texts.

    Teacher: Picture of Catherine AllertonPicture of Mukulika BanerjeePicture of Ivan DeschenauxPicture of Michael EdwardsPicture of Nicholas EvansPicture of Jiazhi FengjiangPicture of David GraeberPicture of Ana GutierrezPicture of Giulia Liberatore1Picture of Lucy Ellen TrotterPicture of Harry WalkerPicture of Valentina ZagariaPicture of Teodor Zidaru Barbulescu

 This course provides training in the reading and interpretation of visual and textual anthropology. It introduces students to detailed, holistic study of social and cultural practices within particular geographic and historical contexts, and develops skills in bringing together the various elements of cultural and social life analysed by anthropologists. 

    Teacher: Picture of Laura BearPicture of Clara DevliegerPicture of Nicholas EvansPicture of Jason HickelPicture of Geoffrey HughesPicture of Nicholas LongPicture of Chloe Nahum-ClaudelPicture of Andrea PiaPicture of Johannes SteinmullerPicture of Alice TilchePicture of Gisa Weszkalnys

The ethnography of the local Christianities in the light of differing cultural and social situations including colonial conditions. The relationship between Christianity and the discipline of anthropology.

    Teacher: Picture of Fenella Cannell

The main object of the course is to help students develop ways of putting the politics, economy and social life of China into a framework in which they can compare and juxtapose it with other major examples. The course introduces students to a range of theoretical approaches from various social science disciplines and encourages them to take a broad, multi-disciplinary approach to understanding China.

    Teacher: Picture of Stephan FeuchtwangPicture of Anni KajanusPicture of William MatthewsPicture of Andrea PiaPicture of Johannes Steinmuller

The anthropological analysis of economic institutions cross-culturally; analysis of the relationship between production and exchange, gifts and commodities, and politics and the economy in a variety of settings.

    Teacher: Picture of Mukulika BanerjeePicture of Tasha FairfieldPicture of Luke HeslopPicture of Jason HickelJuli HuangPicture of Andrew Sanchez1Picture of Gisa Weszkalnys
The twofold aim of this course is to provide students with insight in the process by which anthropological knowledge is produced, and to train them in the collection and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data. In doing so it offers students a methodological framework for conceptualizing and designing their PhD research projects.
    Teacher: Picture of Mathijs Pelkmans
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