Page
    1  2  

Through readings in contemporary ethnography and theory, the Lent term of this course will explore phenomena and questions classically framed as the anthropology of religion. 

    Teacher: Picture of Nicholas EvansPicture of Michael Scott

This course considers a range of contributions made by anthropologists to the analysis of development.

    Teacher: Picture of Clara Devlieger

This course considers a range of contributions made by anthropologists to the analysis of development.

    Teacher: Picture of Clara Devlieger

This course will introduce students to theoretical and ethnographic issues in the history and contemporary life of Southeast Asia (Burma/Myanmar, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, The Philippines, and Vietnam).


    Teacher: Picture of Nicholas Long

This course will introduce students to theoretical and ethnographic issues in the history and contemporary life of Southeast Asia (Burma/Myanmar, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, The Philippines, and Vietnam).

    Teacher: Picture of Nicholas Long

The course examines a number of anthropological and historical studies of local forms of Christianity, from a range including local forms of Catholicism, Mormonism,  contemporary and historical Protestantisms including American Protestant  forms  and 'heretical' and other unorthodox Christianities.

    Teacher: Picture of Fenella Cannell

Through readings in contemporary ethnography and theory, the Lent term of this course will explore phenomena and questions classically framed as the anthropology of religion.  

    Teacher: Picture of Nicholas EvansPicture of Michael Scott

This course focuses on the notion of power and its cross-cultural application. Using Marxist, Weberian, and Foucauldian approaches it explores how power travels through different socio-cultural contexts, paying attention to issues such as domination and resistance, patron-client relations, the mafia, revolution and violence. A recurring theme throughout the course concerns the state. How should the state be studied anthropologically? Processes of state formation and disintegration, nationalism in its various guises, and state-society relations will be reviewed in order to understand how European, post-colonial, and post-socialist societies are governed.

    Teacher: Picture of Mathijs Pelkmans

The anthropological analysis of political and legal institutions as revealed in relevant theoretical debates and with reference to selected ethnography. The development of political and legal anthropology and their key concepts including forms of authority; forms of knowledge and power; political competition and conflict; colonial transformation of indigenous norms; writing legal ethnography of the 'other'; folk concepts of justice; the theory of legal pluralism; accommodation of religious practices in secular laws of European states.

    Teacher: Picture of Chiara ArnavasPicture of Sandhya FuchsPicture of Insa KochPicture of Liisa KohonenPicture of Megnaa MehttaPicture of Mathijs Pelkmans

This course provides a general introduction to Social Anthropology as the comparative study of human societies and cultures. Students will be introduced to key themes and debates in the history of the discipline. Ethnographic case studies will be drawn from work on a variety of societies, including hunter-gatherers, farmers, industrial labourers, and urban city-dwellers.

    Teacher: Picture of Catherine AllertonPicture of Lewis BeardmorePicture of Michael EdwardsPicture of Nicholas EvansPicture of Katharine FletcherPicture of Katherine GardnerPicture of Anishka Gheewala LohiyaPicture of Jason HickelPicture of Geoffrey HughesPicture of Insa KochPicture of Ken Kuroda1Picture of Jonah LiptonPicture of Branwen SpectorPicture of Charles Stafford

The course is intended to give an introduction to anthropological theory through the study of selected ethnographic texts.

    Teacher: Picture of Catherine AllertonPicture of Mukulika BanerjeePicture of Ivan DeschenauxPicture of Michael EdwardsPicture of Nicholas EvansPicture of Jiazhi FengjiangPicture of David GraeberPicture of Ana GutierrezPicture of Giulia Liberatore1Picture of Lucy Ellen TrotterPicture of Harry WalkerPicture of Valentina ZagariaPicture of Teodor Zidaru Barbulescu

 This course provides training in the reading and interpretation of visual and textual anthropology. It introduces students to detailed, holistic study of social and cultural practices within particular geographic and historical contexts, and develops skills in bringing together the various elements of cultural and social life analysed by anthropologists. 

    Teacher: Picture of Laura BearPicture of Clara DevliegerPicture of Nicholas EvansPicture of Jason HickelPicture of Geoffrey HughesPicture of Nicholas LongPicture of Chloe Nahum-ClaudelPicture of Andrea PiaPicture of Johannes SteinmullerPicture of Alice TilchePicture of Gisa Weszkalnys

The ethnography of the local Christianities in the light of differing cultural and social situations including colonial conditions. The relationship between Christianity and the discipline of anthropology.

    Teacher: Picture of Fenella Cannell
Page
    1  2