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Through readings in contemporary ethnography and theory, the Lent term of this course will explore phenomena and questions classically framed as the anthropology of religion. 

    Teacher: Picture of Nicholas EvansPicture of Michael Scott

Twenty-first century anthropology has seen an ‘ontological turn’ or ‘turns’, or more broadly, the emergence of anthropologies of ontology. Increasingly, a variety of anthropological discourses invoking the concept of ontology have come into dialogue, yet ontology-oriented approaches remain diverse. Over the past decade, these discourses have been sites of divisive debate, strong contestation, pointed polemic, and at times personal critique. In the wake of these debates, and keeping them in view, this course aims to illuminate current work around ontology by reading three recent and influential books, each of which takes a distinctive anthropological approach to questions of being.

    Teacher: Picture of Michael Scott

Twenty-first century anthropology has seen an ‘ontological turn’ or ‘turns’, or more broadly, the emergence of anthropologies of ontology. Increasingly, a variety of anthropological discourses invoking the concept of ontology have come into dialogue, yet ontology-oriented approaches remain diverse. Over the past decade, these discourses have been sites of divisive debate, strong contestation, pointed polemic, and at times personal critique. In the wake of these debates, and keeping them in view, this course aims to illuminate current work around ontology by reading three recent and influential books, each of which takes a distinctive anthropological approach to questions of being.

    Teacher: Picture of Michael Scott

This course explores the paradoxes and contexts of social science work on children and youth through an intensive focus on contemporary ethnographies exploring children’s social worlds. This ethnographic work is multi-disciplinary (emerging from anthropology, geography, sociology, media studies), and builds both on earlier ethnographies of childhood from the mid-twentieth-century, and on growing theoretical interest in cross-cultural understandings of ‘the child’ and of children's competencies.

    Teacher: Picture of Catherine Allerton

This course explores the paradoxes and contexts of social science work on children and youth through an intensive focus on contemporary ethnographies exploring children’s social worlds. This ethnographic work is multi-disciplinary (emerging from anthropology, geography, sociology, media studies), and builds both on earlier ethnographies of childhood from the mid-twentieth-century, and on growing theoretical interest in cross-cultural understandings of ‘the child’ and of children's competencies.

    Teacher: Picture of Catherine AllertonPicture of Federico D'Onofrio

This course considers a range of contributions made by anthropologists to the analysis of development.

    Teacher: Picture of Clara Devlieger

This course considers a range of contributions made by anthropologists to the analysis of development.

    Teacher: Picture of Clara Devlieger

This course will introduce students to theoretical and ethnographic issues in the history and contemporary life of Southeast Asia (Burma/Myanmar, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, The Philippines, and Vietnam).


    Teacher: Picture of Nicholas Long

This course will introduce students to theoretical and ethnographic issues in the history and contemporary life of Southeast Asia (Burma/Myanmar, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, The Philippines, and Vietnam).

    Teacher: Picture of Nicholas Long

The course examines a number of anthropological and historical studies of local forms of Christianity, from a range including local forms of Catholicism, Mormonism,  contemporary and historical Protestantisms including American Protestant  forms  and 'heretical' and other unorthodox Christianities.

    Teacher: Picture of Fenella Cannell

Through readings in contemporary ethnography and theory, the Lent term of this course will explore phenomena and questions classically framed as the anthropology of religion.  

    Teacher: Picture of Nicholas EvansPicture of Michael Scott

This course focuses on the notion of power and its cross-cultural application. Using Marxist, Weberian, and Foucauldian approaches it explores how power travels through different socio-cultural contexts, paying attention to issues such as domination and resistance, patron-client relations, the mafia, revolution and violence. A recurring theme throughout the course concerns the state. How should the state be studied anthropologically? Processes of state formation and disintegration, nationalism in its various guises, and state-society relations will be reviewed in order to understand how European, post-colonial, and post-socialist societies are governed.

    Teacher: Picture of Mathijs Pelkmans

The anthropological analysis of political and legal institutions as revealed in relevant theoretical debates and with reference to selected ethnography. The development of political and legal anthropology and their key concepts including forms of authority; forms of knowledge and power; political competition and conflict; colonial transformation of indigenous norms; writing legal ethnography of the 'other'; folk concepts of justice; the theory of legal pluralism; accommodation of religious practices in secular laws of European states.

    Teacher: Picture of Chiara ArnavasPicture of Sandhya FuchsPicture of Insa KochPicture of Liisa KohonenPicture of Megnaa MehttaPicture of Agathe MoraPicture of Mathijs Pelkmans
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