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In this half unit course we will read and discuss texts that draw the history of Europe’s modernity into relation with philosophy.

Starting with Kant’s classic essay ‘Idea for a Universal History with a Cosmopolitan Purpose’ we will explore the development, elaboration and unravelling of the discourse of European modernity in the work of Hegel, Husserl, Valéry, Patočka, Marx, Berlin, Fukuyama, and Derrida.

As globalisation progresses, foreign economic and trade policy acquire ever greater importance for our societies and economies. Few policy domains have recently mobilised the European public opinion as much as trade and foreign economic policy. The purpose of the course is to provide students with a theoretical toolkit and empirical knowledge to analyse the global economy and international trade regime from a distinctly European perspective. The course is structured into two thematic blocs. The first bloc adopts a theoretical lens. It introduces moral, economic and political economy theories dealing with international trade. It provides an overview of European thought on international trade from Ancient Greece to modern trade theory and economics. It then discusses different political economy theories to account for countries and the EU’s trade policy choices. The second bloc of the course adopts an empirical perspective. It extends the debate to the EU’s current challenges in the real of trade. It discusses inter alia the emergence and decline of the multilateral trade regime, the rise of the BRICs and global value chains, the linkages between trade and development policy and the EU’s controversial role as global rule-maker and in investor-to-state arbitration.

    Teacher: Picture of Johann Basedow

The future is unknowable, but it can be made intelligible.  It raises practical and conceptual problems, as well as reasons for conflict, but also promises to resolve contradictions.  This course examines how the future is conceptualised in salient domains of contemporary politics, the implications arising for theory and practice, and the contestable assumptions on which perspectives rely.  It investigates the methods by which the future is ordered, anticipated, and factored into the practice of government.  

The course begins historically, looking at the future as an emerging theme in eighteenth-century European Enlightenment thought, the socio-cultural developments that prompted this, and some of the key features of its thematisation in the high-modern period.  It goes on to examine future-oriented ideas, ideologies and practices as they arise in contemporary settings.  The three fields of administration, economy and society are considered in turn.  Amongst the areas examined are: the changing time horizons of political institutions; risk analysis and emergency planning; state budgeting; debt and accumulation; demographic forecasting; climate change and sustainability; the contested rights of future generations; and the preservation of cultural heritage.  The course should provide students with a cross-disciplinary grasp of how present-day public affairs are shaped by the ways the future is conceived and acted upon.


    Teacher: Picture of Jonathan White

This page is relevant for all MSc students currently enrolled on the following European Institute Programmes:

LSE-Sciences Po Double Degree in European Studies
MSc EU Politics
MSc European Studies (Research)
MSc Global Europe: Culture and Conflict 
MSc Political Economy of Europe 
MSc International Migration and Public Policy

    Teacher: Picture of Johann BasedowEray CayliJoanPicture of Paul De-Grauwepicture1Picture of Spyridon EconomidesPicture of Kevin FeatherstonePicture of Simon GlendinningPicture of Sara HagemannPicture of Denisa KostovicovaPicture of Esra Ozyurek BaerWaltraud SchelklePicture of Miriam SoracePicture of Eiko ThielemannPicture of Pieter TuytensPicture of Jonathan WhitePicture of Natascha Zaun

This course is available on the MSc in Political Economy of Europe and the MSc in Political Economy of Europe (Double Degree).

This is a non-assessed 'crash course' for students who have no prior or little economics background. It may also serve as a targeted refresher course. We cover the entire material of an Intermediate (undergraduate) Economics course, both micro and macro.

    Teacher: Picture of Vassilis Monastiriotis

The objectives of this course are three-fold:

1. DESCRIPTIVE: The course understands the European Union as an emerging 'political system', where there as an on-going interaction between the processes of government (the operation of the institutional and legal framework), public policy (the adoption and impact of policy decisions and EU legislation), and politics (the interests, ideas, opinions and values of the political actors - e.g. citizens, businesses, regions, government ministers, bureaucrats, party leaders). Against this background the principal aim of the course is to provide a detailed knowledge of how national and EU institutions interact in European policy making. To achieve this the course is divided into two parts. The first will introduce principal theories of policy making along three core policy dimensions: agenda setting, decision making, policy implementation. In the second part the conceptual insights gained will be used to analyse a number of substantive policy areas. These will typically include: the single market, social and environmental policies, cohesion policies, common agricultural policy, economic and monetary union, immigration and asylum policy, energy and climate change policy, and EU foreign policy.

2.THEORETICAL: To understand policy making in these areas with the help of general theoretical models/explanations developed in political science and other disciplines such as economics. This means an attempt to widen the dominant focus on so-called 'history-making' decisions in the course of the European integration process (often analysed through International Relations theories) and complement it with insights from the theoretical literature on comparative public policy and administration in order to better understand the 'day to day' decision-making processes in the EU. Among other things, these theories help us explain: why the Member States have delegated agenda setting power to the European Commission; why informal 'policy networks' can sometimes be as important as formal decision-making rules; why market integration and regulation have proceeded faster than social and environmental protection; or why business interests are more effectively represented than other interests in Europe.

3.ANALYTICAL: Finally, the course hence also aims to develop a critical/analytical approach to some of the key questions facing Europe's citizens and political leaders today. E.g. How should the EU institutions be designed? Should there be more or less EU social and environmental regulation? Is the governance of EMU effective? Would we be better off without the Common Agricultural Policy? To what extent does the EU speak with one voice in its foreign policy?

    Teacher: Picture of Iain BeggPicture of Michael BruterPicture of Damian ChalmersPicture of Paul De-GrauwePicture of Floris De-WittePicture of Spyridon EconomidesPicture of Kevin FeatherstonePicture of Maurice FraserPicture of Nilima GulrajaniPicture of Sara HagemannPicture of Simon HixPicture of Sara HoboltPicture of Julian HoernerPicture of Mareike KleinePicture of Jan KomarekPicture of Kyriakos MoumoutzisPicture of Lukas ObholzerWaltraud SchelklePicture of Marco ScipioniPicture of Miriam SoracePicture of Eiko ThielemannPicture of Michael WilkinsonPicture of Auke WillemsPicture of David Woodruff

The focus of this course is on the representation of interests in Europe, and their role in Economic policy-making. Students will analyse the main theoretical issues and selected empirical questions on the role of interests in democratic states, on how interests are differently organised across countries and at the EU level, on the interplay between interest representation and electoral politics, and on policy outcomes after interest intermediation. The objective is to understand the dynamics of economic policy-making in comparative perspective, with an emphasis on the current period of globalisation and on the EU.

    Teacher: Picture of Stephen CoulterPicture of Angela Garcia-CalvoPicture of Robert HanckePicture of Marco Simoni

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the processes of domestic adjustment - in terms of institutional settings, political behaviour and policy processes - contingent on the participation of member states in the European Union. Thus, the course examines differing conceptualisations and empirical applications of 'Europeanisation' within comparative government, politics and public policy. Europeanisation has become an increasingly important focus in contemporary research, as parallel processes of convergence and divergence are apparent in the integration process and the relevance of distinct domestic settings is highlighted in this regard. With a focus on Europeanisation, the perspective is distinct from, but complementary to, existing courses on regional integration and allows students greater scope to examine patterns of domestic response to shared stimuli. At the same time, the course explores the conceptual and methodological issues that are relevant to 'Europeanisation', so as to facilitate an overall evaluation of scholarship to date.

    Teacher: Picture of Kevin FeatherstonePicture of Miriam SoracePicture of Bugra Susler

In this half unit course we will read and discuss texts that draw the history of Europe’s modernity into relation with philosophy.

Starting with Kant’s classic essay ‘Idea for a Universal History with a Cosmopolitan Purpose’ we will explore the development, elaboration and unravelling of the discourse of European modernity in the work of Hegel, Husserl, Marx and Lenin, Valéry, Berlin, Fukuyama, and Derrida.

Registration "statements" for this course are a merely formal requirement. Please feel free simply to state: "I have read the Course Outline and would like to take this course." No background in philosophy is required or expected.

    Teacher: Picture of Cristobal Garibay-PetersenPicture of Simon Glendinning

This course is an introduction to the causes and nature of European integration. The topic is presented from a historical, social scientific and normative perspective: We critically examine various theories of, and current debates about European integration by studying the process of integration, its effects and its constitutional character.

    Teacher: Picture of Damian ChalmersPicture of Spyridon EconomidesPicture of Kevin FeatherstonePicture of Maurice FraserPicture of Sara HagemannPicture of Sara HoboltPicture of Julian HoernerPicture of Mareike KleinePicture of Jan KomarekPicture of Hartmut LenzPicture of Miriam SoracePicture of Michael WilkinsonPicture of Auke WillemsPicture of Natascha Zaun

This course engages with the deepest roots and fundamental trajectory of the contemporary European life-world as identified by three major thinkers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries: Nietzsche, Heidegger and Derrida. Taking up and problematising the Levinasian claim that 'Europe is the Bible and the Greeks', the course explores the idea that Europe is a cultural and political movement in deconstruction, a movement which might be summarized by Nietzsche's madman's pronouncement that "God is dead".

Registration "statements" for this course are a merely formal requirement. Please feel free simply to state: "I have read the Course Outline and would like to take this course". No background in philosophy is required or expected.

    Teacher: Picture of Cristobal Garibay-PetersenPicture of Simon Glendinning

With the expansion of processes of economic integration in the European Union the traditional economic role of the state requires redefinition. Monolithic states progressively become more flexible structures to respond to constituents demands. This is especially the case of those policy areas that are highly relevant for European citizens such as language, culture and welfare. This course attempts to describe these phenomena and its detailed effects on the institutional structure of states. At the same time, given the European Union institutional structure is moving towards some form of federalism, the course discusses how theories of political and fiscal federalism can help to understand these phenomena. The constitutional design of the European Union brings up a large set of theoretical questions on the institutional design to be addressed from the perspective of constitutional political economy. The course is intended to provide an understanding of the political economy of both fiscal and political decentralisation process with a European perspective. The course examines the economic and fiscal incentives and competitive mechanisms of state integration. Finally, it addresses the effects of economic, social and political heterogeneity in the organisation of European Union member states and well as in the European Union itself. Topics include: Introduction to State and Institutional Design. Political, Economic and Fiscal Integration.Constitutional Political Economy of Europe.Economics of Nationalism. Elite Decision Making. Fiscal Federalism and Europe. Leviathan Paradox and Government Size.Competition, Coordination and Cooperation in a Federation. Vertical and Horizontal Competition National Identity and Public Goods. Economic Incentives for State Formation.. Incentives in State Design: Conflict and Cooperation. Experiences of Political and Fiscal Decentralisation in Europe.Language, Culture and Welfare Polices in the European Union member states.

    Teacher: JoanPicture of Angela Garcia-Calvo

The course consists of three parts. In the first section we will discuss the basic arguments and methodological considerations of the Varieties of Capitalism literature and conduct a comparative analysis of the core issue areas in the political economy of contemporary capitalism: how capital, labour and product markets are structured. The next section will build on these thematic treatments to discuss the structure of and dynamics in the three main Western European models of capitalism. In the final section we will discuss how these different models react to new challenges as well as the emergence of capitalism in Central Europe. In week 2 of the summer term there will be a review lecture and seminars.

    Teacher: Picture of Stephen CoulterPicture of Angela Garcia-CalvoPicture of Robert HanckePicture of Abigail InnesPicture of Marco Simoni

The purpose of this course is to analyse the process of European monetary integration and its implications for the institutions of economic governance in the EU. There will be a strong emphasis on using the experience of the financial and economic crises since 2008 as a source of evidence to assess both the performance of EMU and the theories about monetary integration. We consider the political and economic rationale for the establishment of EMU. We study the theory of optimal currency areas and its relevance today.

    Teacher: Picture of Mireia Borrell-PortaPicture of Paul De-GrauwePicture of Pasquale ForestiPicture of Angela Garcia-CalvoPicture of Eddie GerbaPicture of Corrado MacchiarelliPicture of Angelo MartelliPicture of Vassilis MonastiriotisPicture of Chrysoula PapalexatouWaltraud SchelklePicture of Pieter Tuytens

This course investigates various ways in which the State’s authority to act – its legitimacy, in brief – has been underpinned in Europe, both ideologically and institutionally, since the end of the Second World War. It looks at how the State has been used to give expression to the democratic principle, and the ways this has been undermined or rejected. The module aims to provide students with a deep analytical understanding of the changing role of the State in European society.

    Teacher: Picture of Abigail InnesPicture of Jonathan White

The course seeks to understand the post-communist political economic development of Central Europe in comparative context. The course will establish those areas where the region shares common developmental trends with the EU15 while identifying those issues where the region remains a European 'outlier', exploring whether, in those instances, it carries instructive resemblances to other emerging markets globally.

Lecture:

Tuesday 16:00-17:00

Seminar groups:

Wednesday 11:00-12:30 
Wednesday 16:30-18:00

    Teacher: Picture of Abel BojarPicture of Angela Garcia-CalvoPicture of Claire GordonPicture of Abigail InnesPicture of Vassilis Monastiriotis

Europe: Professional Skills seeks to equip you with the relevant tools to engage with Europe and the EU following you degree programme here at the LSE. EU450 will be a key component of your Master's education, introducing common career trajectories that our alumni have pursued and some of the professional skill sets these require. We look forward to a great year ahead!

    Teacher: Picture of Maurice FraserPicture of Julian HoernerJennifer Jackson-Preece
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